Got Truth?

Got Truth - James 1:19-20

On this Labor Day weekend, I’ve got two things on my mind …

One is to step away from my blog and enjoy my family. I hope that you make time for that as well! It’s so important to your marriage to build in times of relaxation and fun (… stepping off my “soapbox”).

Two is to begin a Scripture Memory challenge here at Messy Marriage … “Got Truth?” 🙂

So I will periodically be challenging you to memorize a certain key verse that can encourage you in your life, marriage, and all your relationships. Most importantly, I’ll be memorizing and meditating right alongside each one of you who take this challenge!

Years ago I had this as a spiritual staple firmly established in my life. I remember how it brought me such great comfort in key times. In fact, one time that I remember vividly was when I had gotten fluid on my right knee and the doctor had to drain it and give me a shot of cortisone in that very same inflamed knee.

Y-OUCH!

So I closed my eyes and let God’s word run through my mind over and over while the procedure was being done. It immediately brought such amazing peace and calmness to my heart at that time. And I know it can do the same thing for you in your life and marriage!

So here’s the passage I’m challenging you with this time. And feel free to shorten it to one verse or choose a different version, if you prefer …

“My dear brothers and sisters, take note of this: Everyone should be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry, because human anger does not produce the righteousness that God desires.” ~James 1:19-20 (NIV)

FYI, I’m going to be back to a Sloppy Joe Video next week on the trouble with “fighting fire with fire” in times of conflict, so I hope you’ll join me again then. Plus, the following week I’ll be sharing some guidelines on how to choose a good Christian counselor, as well as, sharing a new Bible verse to memorize. So stay tuned!

 

What’s a favorite Bible verse that you’d like to memorize and meditate on?

 

How has this habit in your life encouraged you or if you’ve never done it, how do you feel it will help?

 


Linking up with – Marriage Mondays, The Weekend Brew, Making Your Home SingMondays @ Soul Survival,  Sunday Stillness,  Sharing His Beauty, Spiritual Sundays, Words with Winter and  Playdates with God

 

 

  • Beth,
    Thank you for these words this morning. I have been working on these very things in my marriage. We have been married 44 years but I can be overbearing, controlling and lose my temper. Not nearly as much as before but I still go there occasionally.

    We have been talking about this in Bible study too. We studied 1 Peter 1:13-16. We read different translations and I liked “prepare your minds for action”. Think about how I will act, think about the way I will think. Get rid of old patterns, and knee jerk reactions – break the old habit. In order to be “holy” or as your passage says – “righteous” I must work at it. Romans 12;2 – Transform my mind.

    Thanking God for this wonderful connection He has given us.
    Blessings,
    Janis

    • I love many passages in 1 Peter, Janis. That’s going to be a great place to focus! And yes, it is all about transforming our minds and the ways we think, which transforms the way we feel eventually as well. Thanks for coming by and encouraging me, my friend. It’s always a pleasure to have you visit!

  • Andrew Budek-Schmeisser

    First, Beth, I hope you and your family have a wonderful holiday!

    You’ve picked an excellent verse, and one very apropos to Labour Day. So often, the workplace is a bourn in which anger and bitterness festers…and holidaymaking can generate more conflict than ease.

    This is a verse that all should take to heart.

    When I was younger I used to memorize Scripture (even though I was at the time a Buddhist); later on in life, the nurturing of an eidetic memory and its subsequent use for practical matters somewhat spoiled the process for me. That kind of memorization now brings back memories of places and events I would as soon forget.

    So I limit my memorized Scripture to a single verse – “Jesus wept.”

    Aside from being the easiest verse in the whole Bible to remember, I find that those two words sum up everything we need to know, when taken in their context; to wit, that Jesus’ heart could touch our own…and more important, that our sorrows were His.

    He knew that He would raise Lazarus, but He was so deeply moved by the grief of Lazarus’ family and friends that it overwhelmed Him.

    And He wept. Not for the tragedy which, like all tragedies, would eventually be reversed, but for the significance and importance of the moment.

    I find that comforting, particularly under some of the present circumstances in my life.

    http://blessed-are-the-pure-of-heart.blogspot.com/2015/09/your-dying-spouse-52-i-want-to-live-fmf.html

    • Yes, I had not thought about how that could bring up unpleasant memories, especially for someone with PTSD, Andrew. However, I’d think that choosing verses that you didn’t memorize then to memorize now would not have the same effect. But you’ve certainly got enough on your plate, so I’m in no way trying to pressure you. I vaguely remember you mentioning your “Buddhist” past. I would think that would be another factor that might make forging new Christian beliefs more difficult. It makes me wonder if it has made some Christian beliefs harder to internalize or if there’s some patching of your past Buddhist belief-system with your Christian belief-system now. But yes, Jesus’ response at Lazarus’ death says it all! He truly is such a compassionate and affectionate God. I am studying the gospel of Matthew and see it all over that book! Thanks so much for stopping by, my friend! You are always in my thoughts and prayers!

      • Andrew Budek-Schmeisser

        Thank you for the thoughtful reply! I actually meant that it was the ‘act of memorization’, of deliberately committing something to memory exactly as it stood, that is the trouble. It could be song lyrics, anything. There’s a certain method to ‘advanced’ memorization, and it’s hard to dissociate using that method with the events of the past.

        I rely on the Bible ‘stories’, instead. It helps that they let me think in pictures rather than words.

        The crossover between Buddhism and Christianity is interesting; certainly there are a lot of Buddhist foundational elements there. The main difference I find in daily life is that those who were raised Christian have a more linear worldview, while mine is cyclic. Part of that comes, I think, from being Asian; the monsoon rhythm is in my genes, and that dominates all life in the Orient. Makes me a bit more phlegmatic and accepting of things that others might not accept; certainly, it helps under the present circumstances.

        It’s far easier to see pain and illness as part of life; it takes away the need for resentment, and allows one to concentrate on the good that remains.

  • These are the Scriptures that come in the night, aren’t they. The ones we learned as little ones. Most of mine still roll in the King James language. And they soothe my soul and re-calibrate my thinking.

    It does get harder as we get older. But if we can remember all those online passwords, this we can do!

    Have fun with your gang, sweet friend!

  • Mary

    I have so many favorite Bible verses now and they change as the seasons in my life change. I have decided to begin each day with a breath prayer, concentrating on one verse each week. I’ll let you know how it goes. Blessings as you enjoy this long weekend with your family.

  • Melanie Redd

    Hey Beth,

    Happy Labor Day! Hope you are enjoying some time with your family today~

    I love to idea of really focusing on and memorizing more scripture! I was in Psalm 27 today – especially soaking on verses 13-14.

    Came over on Me, Coffee, and Jesus today. I also followed you by email.

    Blessings,
    Melanie